Dermatology

Harley Street Dermatology Clinic 

Our dermatology clinic in Harley Street, London, offers a range of skin treatments for a variety of conditions including acne treatment, mole removal, hyperhidrosis, psoriasis, rosacea and milia removal from our specialist dermatologists.

Our first appointments will be held from our flagship clinic in Harley Street, London, but we will be introducing them nationwide throughout the year.

Meet our Consultant Dermatologists

Georgi Tzakov | Harley Medical GroupDR. GEORGI TZAKOV

After completing a Physicians Master’s Degree, Dr. Georgi Tzakov went on to graduate as a Consultant Dermatologist in 2003 in his home country of Bulgaria and since then has over 14 years’ experience in Bulgaria, USA and in the UK (NHS and private practice). Dr. Tzakov continued his education and completed a postgraduate Masters in Dermatology and Venereology.

Georgi is fluent in English, Bulgarian and Russian and when he is not consulting his clients or removing unwanted lesions you can find him on the slopes of his home town where he is a volunteer with the National Ski Patrol.

DR. JUSTINE HEXTALL

Dr. Justine Hextall is a Consultant Dermatologist and Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. She trained for five years at St John's Institute of Dermatology. She is the clinical and skin cancer lead at Western Sussex Hospitals Foundation Trust, three years ago she was appointed as skin cancer chair for the Sussex NSSG.

A passionate advocate of dermatology education, she is the local training programme director for dermatology registrars and has recently been appointed as educational lead for the Sussex Cancer Network. She lectures both nationally and internationally and has numerous peer reviewed publications. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, a member of the British Association of Dermatology and British Society for dermatological surgery and the European Academy of dermatovenereology.

 

Book your consultation with a dermatologist

 

Our skin is something we often take for granted. We may clean it, exfoliate it and occasionally moisturise it, but generally, we take our skin for granted... but did you know: 

  • It’s the largest organ of your body
  • It would cover an area of approximately two square meters
  • It accounts for approximately 15% of your body weight
  • It is made up of three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous
  • You have the same number of melanocytes as everyone else; your skin colour is due to their activity, not the quantity.
  • It contains 11 miles of blood vessels

 

Why caring for your skin is essential

We often say that we know something as well we as know the back of our hand. Our skin is something we very much take for granted, we may notice a new wrinkle or a monster pimple, but on the whole we barely notice our skin at all. Despite our negligence our skin plays some fundamental roles in our general well-being. 

  • Protection

Your skin provides a barrier to harmful environmental aggressors like germs and UV radiation. The skin's slightly acid surface is essential in preventing bacteria attacks which can cause irritation and infection. Even our skin’s ability to “tan” (increased melanin production) is a system designed to protect us from UV radiation.

  • Barrier

Our skin cells need water, yet if the surface of our skin (and the walls of our skin cells themselves) did not have a “waterproofing” effect, all the water in our skin would evaporate and the cells would die.  The outermost layer of skin is made up of keratin, which likes oils much more than it likes water acting as a protective waterproof barrier.

  • Absorption

While the outermost layer of skin is designed to repel water, it can also selectively absorb oily substances that are small enough to penetrate in between the cells.  Technically speaking, the keratin creates a semi-permeable membrane.  This is why skincare products with small molecules can penetrate the skin while others sit on the surface.

  • Information transmitter

Nerves in the skin respond to different stimuli, including touch, pain, pressure and temperature by passing along information to the central nervous system.

  • Temperature regulation

Your skin regulates your body temperature. When we're hot, our skin can cool our entire bodies by sweating and also increasing blood flow, which allows heat to be lost through the skin.  In contrast, when we're cold, the diameter of our blood vessels decreases, which reduces blood flow, retaining heat in the body.

  • Chemical Synthesiser

Complex chemical reactions are constantly going on in our skin to keep cells regenerating, repairing damage and even converting sunlight into Vitamin D.