Dermatologists doubt effectiveness of drinkable sunscreen

When it comes to using sunscreen, its packaging always features a variety of warnings – from external use only, to seeking medical help should you swallow its contents. However, there’s a new form of sun protection on the market that allows you to do just that – ladies and gentlemen, the drinkable sunscreen. Reported to be able to cancel out approximately 97 per cent of the sun’s damaging UVA and UVB rays, the skincare company claims that the sunscreen offers protection equal to that of an SPF 30 for up to three hours. A video posted on YouTube features the skincare line’s founder, Dr. Ben Johnson, explaining “harmonized water, simply put, is the imprinting of radio frequency energy onto the molecules of water.” However, Dermatologists are wary about the drinkable sunscreen – and are unsure about its reportedly protective properties. “I’m concerned that you’re going to get a burn, you’re going to have this false sense of security and actually it’s going to increase your risk of melanoma,” stated Dr. Shirley Chi, a Dermatologist at the Center for Advanced Dermatology, Inc. Her worries were closely echoed by the American Academy of Dermatology, after the group released a statement warning users about substituting sunscreen with UV Harmonizing water; highlighting the absence of any valid scientific evidence. Upon closer inspection on the list of ingredients, the label was found to contain water as well as something referred to as “multiple vibration frequency blends”. Would you give drinkable sunscreen a go? Voice your thoughts on Twitter.